Modern Mechanix Round-UP

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First up today on Modern Mechanix we have this prediction of what the year 2008 will be like. Published in the November 1968 Mechanix Illustrated, this article, actually titled “40 Years in the Future” was part of MI’s 40th anniversary issue and is full of predictions about the role of computers, domed cities, ultra-fast cars and ocean bottom resort hotels. We also looked at plans for another propeller driven monorail system, a scary 1936 article pitching J. Edgar Hoover’s plan to fingerprint every U.S. citizen, a beautiful 1924 ad for ranger bicycles, a nifty looking pontoon fishing boat, a motorcycle driven by a car engine, and “proof” that the Loch Ness monster is just a whale.

This weekend we looked at plans for an atomic powered “Atoms for Peace” dirigible, a 1939 Bell Telephone ad inviting patrons to go take a tour of their local telephone facility, a roundup of antique motorcycles a typewriter designed for deaf typists, a crash proof lightning bug car, a race for telephone linemen, and a man who makes wooden silverware for arctic explorers. If you have a pair of those old red-blue 3D glasses hanging around you’ll want to pull them out for this article about aerial topographical maps of America from WWII. Also, learn about the secrets of America’s flying salesmen, special effects wizardry on the Ernie Kovac’s show, how to change your skinny, pimply looks and a 1956 advertisement touting the first eight years of development of the transistor.

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