The FakeTV: welfare home security gets a $49 upgrade

faketv.jpg

The FakeTV is an appropriately named $49 anti-burglary boob tube. It does just one thing: it makes it look like someone is basking in the flickering glow of the television at midnight, simulating the stroboscopic effect of a real television but at a fraction of the real electrical cost. The manufacturers swear it will simulate “the light effects of real television programming – scene changes, camera pans, fades, flicks, swells, on-screen motion, and more.” Not bad. Now let’s hope no burglar ever gets the bright idea to rob your house in the day time.

FakeTV [Official Site]

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12 Responses to The FakeTV: welfare home security gets a $49 upgrade

  1. Anonymous says:

    You could probably go to a thrift store and get a real tv for less than the fake one. Also, don’t most people have tv’s these days, why not just turn that one on.

  2. Enochrewt says:

    #2: Yeah, I forget that criminals of this ilk are dumb.

    #5: I think the point is to use less energy than a CRT TV.

  3. semiotix says:

    “Now let’s hope no burglar ever gets the bright idea to rob your house in the day time.”

    Oh, I watch TV all day, too. So do all my burglar friends, for that matter.

  4. Enochrewt says:

    Does it make sound like a TV? It all makes sense in the picture shown, but if this thing is on the first floor with a burglar/lerker underneath the window, it’d be suspicious if there was no sound.

  5. technogeek says:

    No sound may mean muted, or captioned, or headphones. And I think you’re attributing more intelligence to the the would-be burglar than is typically the case.

    On the other hand, this reminds me a bit of an old Mad Magazine strip…

    “Why are you leaving the stereo on?”
    “To make the house seem occupied while we’re away.”
    (later)
    “Hey, nice stereo.”
    “Yeah. Let’s steal it.”

    There are plusses and minuses to this simulation.

    What ever happened to just putting a few _lamps_ on a timer? Much less expensive than this light box…

  6. artbot says:

    It’s like the modern equivalent of that 70s lp that sounds like a “typical” conversation between a man & woman. Apparently it came with instructions on how to make it play in a loop on your phonograph. Look for the mp3 of it on WFMU’s blog – it’s shockingly silly and hilarious.

  7. rteder says:

    60% of all burglaries happen during the day time, and FakeTV is of no help there. So stop your mail when you are away, and (better yet, for any number of reasons) get to know your neighbors!

    And lamps on a timer are a great idea, because they give a great first impression and can be seen from the street.

    But for discouraging prowlers, FakeTV is extremely convincing. The simulation is essentially perfect, and my friends in law enforcement tell me that the “know” someone is home if they see an operating television.

  8. Anonymous says:

    Why not just leave the TV on? Even if this gadget uses less energy, you’d have to use it a while to make up for the $49… Dumb idea if you ask me.

  9. Heather_R says:

    Suburban ambiance as a deterrent. The brilliance of this is deep and haunting.

  10. Anonymous says:

    QVC.com has these for $29.42, until they run out of stock.

  11. filmwallah says:

    this product’s intended use might be a little like whistling to keep the tigers away -but it looks like a great source of simulated TV light for video/film production. If it is bright enough- it will look much better that a bunch of blue gels waved in front of a hidden light. it’s small and easily hidden. could be worth trying out.

  12. Anonymous says:

    I have two cheaper (free) solutions:

    1. Leave your TV on while you are away.

    2. Use your media player on your PC to “loop” repeatedly over a piece of video while you are away. Don’t forgot to turn off your video sleep mode.

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