GPS recording gadget debunks psychic’s child abuse allegation

After school officials suggested her severely autistic daughter was being abused because a psychic told them so, mom Colleen Leduc had the perfect scientific smack-down: 24/7 GPS records of her daughter’s location, with audio.

Leduc equipped 11-year old, non-verbal Victoria with a GPS device that never stops recording – evidence that demonstrated the allegations could not possibly be true.

Leduc’s nightmare began in May, when after picking her daughter up from an Autistic Spectrum Disorder class, she was summoned back to LIvigstone East school by an urgent call. From the Barrie Examiner:

Frightened, Leduc rushed back to the school. She and Victoria entered a room where they were met by the principal, the vice-principal and the teacher. Leduc said they advised her that Victoria’s educational assistant (EA) had visited a psychic, who said a youngster whose name started with “V” was being sexually abused by a man between 23 and 26 years old. Leduc was also handed a list of recent behaviours exhibited by her daughter.

Dr. Lindy Zaretsky, the school board superintendent and who brings a shining new light to the phrase “jobsworth,” claims they were obliged to initiate investigations. The investigator assigned to the case, however, immediately closed it and described it as “ridiculous.”

Dr. Zaretsky, you are obliged to not be stupid.

Leduc says that reports from psychics shouldn’t be grounds for investigations.

“A, I don’t believe in psychics. B, (Victoria) is not around people who are those ages (mentioned by the psychic),” she said. “C, she has GPS with a listen-in device. And D, it’s an insult to me as a parent because I’m so diligent with her and who she’s around.””

Astonishingly, the board stands by its decision, even though the information came from a psychic and appears to be false. They would do it again. The allegations will remain on file forever.

“I think they require more education about dealing with an autistic child,” Leduc told the Examiner.

Psychic’s charge of abuse leaves Barrie mom fuming
[Barrie Examiner]

About Rob Beschizza

Rob Beschizza is the Managing Editor of Boing Boing. He's @beschizza on Twitter and can be found on Facebook too. Try your luck at besc...@gmail.com

 

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

23 Responses to GPS recording gadget debunks psychic’s child abuse allegation

  1. Enochrewt says:

    Oh, well that’s just dumb then.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Wow. Just wow. Reading it reminded me of the classic Lewis Black routine “If it weren’t for my horse, I wouldn’t have spent that year in college.” http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Lewis_Black#The_White_Album . It’s almost the “dumbest thing I’d ever heard in my life.”

  3. Bugs says:

    Two reactions spring immediately to mind:

    1) Fcuk yeah! Go science!

    2) What the bloody hell were the school thinking? Seriously, what bunch of educated adults is willing to accuse a parent of sexually abusing his own daughter based on the ramblings of some fairground charlatan? I really can’t find the words to express how angry this wilful stupidity makes me. The psychic should be locked up (fraud?), and whoever failed to fight the decisions to report this formally and act upon it should be fired.


    *Deep breath*

    My apologies, but such willful stupidity always gets me disproportionately angry, and in this case they actually tried to ruin a family’s lives.

    I sincerely hope the parents can find the time and energy to raise hell over this.

  4. Luc says:

    That GPS device sounds pretty cool. A mobile phone?

  5. voxluna says:

    > This sounds whackier than the Guided Communication fiasco a decade ago.

    Oh, you mean Facilitated Communication? It’s still being practiced far and wide, offering the same opportunity to allege sexual abuse of a nonverbal child.

  6. dculberson says:

    So, if I told the chief of police that someone whose last name begins with “z” was molesting children at the school, would they then be obliged to investigate, leaving a permanent record that she had been accused of that?

  7. themindfantastic says:

    I went up to a girl once and told her she was to be my love slave because a psychic told me so… after I left the hospital from numerous injuries, I am just waiting for the restraining order to be lifted so she can in her June Cleaver outfit serve me endlessly for all eternity. How do I know this, the psychic would never just make up this stuff would he? It has to be true.

  8. Lea Hernandez says:

    Magic, save us from your followers.
    As a mother of an autistic kid who has fought ridiculous shit numerous times (none of it abuse accusations, thank goodness), I’d be surprised if these parents hadn’t gone through the same.
    This, for me, would be the last gdamn straw, and I would have a rich kid.

    I believe most (not ALL, don’t want to hear YOUR “to be fair” story) schools fail autistic kids and their families miserably.

    I love that investigator, though. The two school investigators I’ve met with (yes, two) have been very cool. They’ve got no time for admin grudge shit and trivia. Bless ‘em.

  9. jgriffiths says:

    I think they require more education about dealing with an autistic child.

    Or maybe just more education generally? If they’re inclined to believe fucking psychics.

    Seriously, I hope this woman sues the school and the psychic – there’s got to be some kind of case you can make for defamation/libelous accusations, trauma etc.

  10. Anonymous says:

    oh my god. what what what??!?!??!!?
    i thought this was in the states (sorry americans). and then i find out it is only a few minutes north of me in toronto. i guess i can no longer feel smug.

  11. Mr Tibbs says:

    It is my understanding that CPS must investigate all accusations, despite their ridiculous nature, for better or worse.

  12. Daniel Rutter says:

    Sensible investigators sometimes do take action when someone tells them they’ve got a “psychic” intuition about a crime.

    The action the investigators take, though, is to check out the alleged psychic. Because it’s possible that the actual reason why they know something about the crime is that they, or someone they know, committed it.

  13. richardchaven says:

    This sounds whackier than the Guided Communication fiasco a decade ago.

  14. w000t says:

    I think the clear idiot here is the “Educational Assistant” who: A, visited the psychic in the first place; B, believed the psychic; and C, felt the psychic’s “reading” was grounds to report abuse.

    The school is probably obliged to follow up on and/or investigate any report of abuse, but the EA could have exercised some restraint from idiocy and never reported such a spurious claim.

  15. catbeller says:

    School administrators are cut from the same cloth as the rest of America. America believes in magic. BELIEVES. Angels, UFOs, Jesus-shaped wallpaper stains, psychics, crop circles, that what Britney Spears does is somehow their business… belief in unreality is a cascading phenomenon. Such things can get you imprisoned or killed. Remember the witchcraft madness of the late 1980’s? It ain’t over. And believers in the unreal tend to have lots of babies. Their numbers are growing, one baby carriage at a time.

  16. ridestowe says:

    gah! how are people so dumb! i don’t understand it, shouldn’t these idiots have gotten hit by a train by now? how’d they make it this far in life?!

  17. brynnablue says:

    The EA needs to be fired and prevented from working with children, if she is going to do something as stupid as this. She has severely disrupted this child’s life, as well as her mother’s (I cannot stress this part enough), and her ridiculous insistence on reporting this to CPS now means they have a permanent file about this BS. I know “everyone makes mistakes” but this is WAY out of line. Didn’t anyone at the school think to check the audio logs before doing this?
    Though it will be difficult to find another school for this child, she clearly does not need to be at that one. What a pack of fools.

  18. dargaud says:

    Can’t she press charges for making false accusations ? For that matter, why isn’t it possible to press charges for outright stupidity ?!?

  19. Chevan says:

    >So, if I told the chief of police that someone whose last name begins with “z” was molesting children at the school, would they then be obliged to investigate, leaving a permanent record that she had been accused of that?

    Yes.

    Child services/schools/the police/organizations of that nature are required to investigate all accusations.

    Sometimes it’s really disruptive and can screw up someone’s life, but other times it ensures that actual abuse isn’t waved away by a declaration of “Oh, that’s just silly.”

    I’m inclined to take the good with the bad, but I’ve never been exactly comfortable with it.

  20. airship says:

    I think they should lock a time bomb around that guy’s neck and have him rely on the same psychic to tell him the lock’s combination before it blows.

  21. Enochrewt says:

    The first question in my mind is “Why is an autistic child meeting with a psychic without parental permission?”

    Lawsuit forthcoming, that’s going to be one rich autistic kid.

  22. Rob Beschizza says:

    It was a teaching assistant who met with the psychic; the psychic cold-read them.

  23. treetop says:

    Truth is, mere conversational accusation regarding the welfare of children these days is more than enough for the appropriate “agency” to become involved. It’s almost as if those in charge decide to look at any and all instances as suspect. Thats good, but discrimination between real and not-real has to made early, or else you get this.
    Honestly, I think the EA is culpable here. It was her idea to visit a psychic.
    Somebody ought to order her financial records, If she’s in charge of risky special needs kids, she needs to be spotless.
    Both real and not-real.
    What are the chances the EA has issues?

    Hmmmmm.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

 

More BB

Boing Boing Video

Flickr Pool

Digg

Wikipedia

Advertise

Displays ads via FM Tech

RSS and Email

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License permitting non-commercial sharing with attribution. Boing Boing is a trademark of Happy Mutants LLC in the United States and other countries.

FM Tech