Boom Computing

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“What’s that funny glow outside, dear?”

“Just the Russians, darling. Thankfully, I have my Nuclear Bomb Effects Computer right here. By my estimation, we’re in ‘damage to vehicles, roofing and exposed joists, moderate risk.’ Terribly glad we went for the suburbs, what?”

Boom computing [Nonist via FFFound]

About Rob Beschizza

Rob Beschizza is the Managing Editor of Boing Boing. He's @beschizza on Twitter and can be found on Facebook too. Try your luck at besc...@gmail.com

 

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11 Responses to Boom Computing

  1. dderidex says:

    “The father of a friend of mine used to work on a boomer sub, and had one of these. He chose their house based on its distance from the nearest strategic targets, and always kept iodine and potassium tablets in the house.”

    See, I go the other way. Working in Downtown, Major City, USA is fine by me.

    I figure if there ever is a nuclear war…I’ll never know about it.

  2. ndrummond says:

    This little gizmo was a calcuation aide included in the book titled “The Effects of Nuclear Weapons” co-authored by Samuel Glasstone and Philip J. Dolan, published in three editions – 1950, 1962 and 1977 -(originally titled The Effects of Atomic Weapons). The book, published by the US government, is still one of the few technical tomes regarding the subject- the 1977 version is available online at: (minus the plastic slide-rule)

    http://www.princeton.edu/~globsec/publications/effects/effects.shtml

  3. ndrummond says:

    This little gizmo was a calcuation aide included in the book titled “The Effects of Nuclear Weapons” co-authored by Samuel Glasstone and Philip J. Dolan, published in three editions – 1950, 1962 and 1977 -(originally titled The Effects of Atomic Weapons). The book, published by the US government, is still one of the few technical tomes regarding the subject- the 1977 version is available online at: (minus the plastic slide-rule)

    http://www.princeton.edu/~globsec/publications/effects/effects.shtml

  4. mdhatter says:

    Eeps. I think I’ve played with one of these.

    My father was trained to deliver tactical nuclear weapons from his tiny (propeller driven) aircraft carrier based Navy airplane in the very early 60’s.

    I think they used it to convince themselves they could actually get away from the blast in their tiny low altitude planes.

  5. mgfarrelly says:

    For some reason, as a kid, I was obsessed with nuclear blasts/weapons. I watched “The Day After” on video and “Threads” and “Testament” and “Miracle Mile” incessantly. Monsters and zombies and creatures of myth never scared me or gave me as creepy a thrill as reading about blast effects, doomsday scenarios and MAD strategies.

    So yeah, I had one of these as a ten year old. And loved it.

  6. OM says:

    …When Dr. Strangelove premiered, theaters could buy boxes of “official Dr. Strangelove” NECs to give away to theater patrons who saw the film. IIRC, one actually showed up on an episode of Star Trek!

  7. strider_mt2k says:

    My Fuhrer!

    I can walk!

  8. strider_mt2k says:

    Does it say “duck and cover” on the back?

  9. Scuba SM says:

    The father of a friend of mine used to work on a boomer sub, and had one of these. He chose their house based on its distance from the nearest strategic targets, and always kept iodine and potassium tablets in the house.

  10. Anonymous says:

    Dr Strangelove, “Well let’s see now ah, cobalt thorium G. aa… nn… Radioactive halflife of uh,… hmm.. I would think that uh… possibly uh… one hundred years.

  11. peggah says:

    Weird, I found one of those while helping my boyfriend move. It creeped me out.

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