Video: Industrial robot arms in bloodless melee combat

No one has a clue exactly what’s going on in this video: it appears that these robots have been pre-programmed to exhibit an axe vs. mace match, but not actually ever hit each other. That’s a real shame, but does legitimize the plot of Robot Jox ever so slightly: It takes a human to convince a robot that it’s okay to kill.

[via BotJunkie via Geekologie]

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13 Responses to Video: Industrial robot arms in bloodless melee combat

  1. mdhatter says:

    Looks like a maker got hold of a cylon and repurposed it.

  2. AirPillo says:

    #5: “I’m guessing it’d be a no-no to reprogram the ones at work to do this.”

    Only if the robots leave behind witnesses to testify against you. You know what to do.

  3. coriolinus says:

    I got a similar video of what seems to be a predecessor of this; the robots were using lightsabers at the time. [Google Video]

  4. Anonyman says:

    s/axe/scythe

  5. GuabaMan says:

    I the upcoming femsapien robot can be programed to
    fence with a partner.

    Like the first two weapons the morning star like mace and the one hand scythe.

  6. Scuba SM says:

    I’m guessing it’d be a no-no to reprogram the ones at work to do this.

  7. FoetusNail says:

    This is a much better demo than you’ll usually see at a trade show. Industrial robots are easily damaged or will go over limit and shutdown with even small impacts.

    Highly recommend going to the International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS) at least once in your life. The show is held every other year in Chicago at McCormick Place. The size and scope of this show is mind blowing.

  8. technogeek says:

    Judging by the control panel, my guess would be that this is a museum display intended to do automated “combat demos” illustrating typical attack/defense patterns with these weapons. Personally, I’d rather watch the human demonstrators associated with the Higgins Armory Sword Guild, who do choreographed but historically accurate bare-steel drills… but machines can be on duty 24x7x365 without breaking the bank.

  9. HotSake says:

    I think you’re confused about the plot of Robot Jox. It was about gladiators who settled international disputes with giant robots (which makes them not robots at all but giant-walking-tanks-with-legs-instead-of-treads). The main plot revolved around a grudge match between the brutal Russian pilot, Alexander, and the dashing American, Achilles, over who would control Alaska. Robot Jox earns the right to exist by virtue of pretty much anything Alexander says.

    “Ha! One week you’re mine, I kill you dead!”

  10. Tony Moore says:

    i used to work preventive maintenance at Toyota, and i can safely say that i have seen very little that is more mesmerizing that watching the fluid motions of programmed industrial robots. You think it’s nice watching ‘em play fight, you should see when they’re welding car parts and sparks are flying everywhere. it’s like if ballet were awesome and metal.

    -T

  11. chef says:

    The knight just needs a motor to become Zaku Knight, and full of win.

    I think that Robot Jox was a movie that looked awesome until you watched it and the tears started falling. Crash and burn indeed.

  12. danbanana says:

    oh, this is a great idea: teach robots how to fight hand-to-hand. has the lesson of sarah conner not sunk in yet? when computers and robots are macing us as well as shooting us and holding our own nuclear stockpile over our heads, i’m blaming… well, all the tech people, at least.

  13. Waffles says:

    I really like (to think) that the different combinations of weapons make for different fighting animations. The face that robo-arm A was wielding a rapier the way you could except a human to wield one makes me a little happy.

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