Day and Night watch measures sunlight, not time

day_and_night.jpg

Romain Jerome’s post-apocalypse-punk Night and Day watch can just barely be described as a time piece: it only reports day or night.

World First – An exceptional timepiece that does not indicate the time!

With no display for the hours, minutes or seconds the Day&Night offers a new way of measuring time, splitting the universe of time into two fundamentally opposing sections: day versus night.

A new interpretation of Time based around two Tourbillons operating sequentially. The Day Tourbillon operates during the day, defining the wearer’s period of activity, and stops after twelve hours, handing over to the Night Tourbillon dedicated to man’s own private sphere.

Perfect for vampires or wasteland scavengers trying to descry bedtime through the heavy radioactive smog.

Romain Jerome Day and Night [Official Site via Oh Gizmo]

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12 Responses to Day and Night watch measures sunlight, not time

  1. pork musket says:

    Day&Night offers a new way of measuring time, splitting the universe of time into two fundamentally opposing sections: day versus night.

    They are seriously trying to take credit for the concept of day and night? I’d like to punch whoever wrote this marketing material right in the cocksucker.

  2. Tommy says:

    Here’s my new watch: You guess at the time and it says “Nope.”

  3. gnoodles says:

    ETI @ 7 said:

    And it’s completely unintuitive. I have no idea what the face of that watch is telling me.

    True, but if you can afford a $300,000 watch, you don’t care. You have people who tell time for you.

  4. technogeek says:

    I’ve said for years that I want a watch based on the Franklin clock — one hand, four hour sweep. You generally know roughly what time of day it is; that one hand is enough to narrow it down to within five minutes or so, which is really about as much wrist-borne accuracy as a non-stressful life ever needs.

    Of course my life isn’t that relaxed… but with a watch of this sort, I could dream it was. And realistically, if I need more precision I generally carry at least two other devices that can operate as clocks and am surrounded by others.

    And a one-handed clock should be a bit cheaper to construct, too. Fewer moving parts.

  5. Ari B. says:

    When they don’t mention the price, you know you can’t afford it…

  6. LeavingHalfway says:

    Those are indeed those people. And for some reason, I thought the idea for the watch was really cool. It would have been way better if it could keep track of the solstice/equinox cycle for a given latitude (user changeable?), and all mechanically.

    There’s something about a ridiculously complicated physical mechanism to do the work of $0.05 of silicon that I find compelling.

    And, I don’t wear a watch :)

  7. randrews says:

    I’ve worn a Yes watch ( http://www.yeswatch.com ) for a few years now. It works differently but tells you the same information.

  8. Anonymous says:

    “World First – An exceptional timepiece that does not indicate the time!”

    I’m not sure this is actually a world first… I wore a broken watch in the 80′s that could loosely be described as “exceptional” and certainly did not tell time.

  9. inkadinka12 says:

    Does this even do what it is supposed to do, namely indicate day or night? Does it switch at sunrise & sunset? Does it show mostly day during the summer in Alaska? Or does it simply toggle every 12 hours? The latter is not all that interesting, but the former could be cool. It would require that the watch be calibrated for location and date, but at $300K it could include a days worth of a technician’s time.

  10. eti says:

    And it’s completely unintuitive. I have no idea what the face of that watch is telling me.

  11. wil9000 says:

    I have my own take on this watch, at my blog, a while back:

    (http://blacknewblack.blogspot.com/2008/04/are-you-obscenely-wealthy-are-you.html)

    And by the way, the cost is 300,000 US dollars. Rumor is that 400 were made, and all sold right away.

    Sad that the rich have to invent ridiculous ways to throw their money away. So sad.

  12. LeSinge says:

    Aren’t these the dudes that make watches out of pieces of the Titanic? Or did I dream that?

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