Sleeping Beauty Blu-Ray requires viewers to agree to 57 page EULA

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Disney’s release of its first Blu-Ray title, Sleeping Beauty, contains over one hundred and twenty pages of legalese when completely unspooled, including a 57 page EULA to access the BD-Live content and a 63 page privacy policy.

A shame that they didn’t deign to release Fantasia on Blu-Ray first: this EULA would be the insane legalistic equivalent of the multiplying brooms in “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice.”

Disney Goes EULA Crazy On Sleeping Beauty Blu-Ray [Format War Central]

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25 Responses to Sleeping Beauty Blu-Ray requires viewers to agree to 57 page EULA

  1. heavyboots says:

    Here is part of the problem. For PS3 owners who don’t want to mess with the internet content, there is no easy way to completely disable internet access via BR discs from a PS3.

    If internet access was disabled, that message wouldn’t pop up. However, Sony in their infinite wisdom has only two BR Internet Connection prefs–Always Connect or Confirm Before Connecting. If you leave it on the default “Confirm”, it will ask you every freaking time you start playback again!

    Start the movie? Confirm. Stop it to go make popcorn and then restart? Confirm. Stop to answer a phone call and restart? Confirm. All in the same movie during the same viewing session.

    So WTF is my “Never Connect” option? I couldn’t care less about the internet component of BR–just leave me to watch my hi-def movie in peace! If I was more conspiracy-theory prone, I’d say it’s a plot by Sony to force everyone to always connect to the internet before they can do something simple as watch a movie.

    If this bothers you from either a usability or privacy standpoint, be sure to file a feature request with Sony.

  2. CraziestGadgetsdotcom says:

    i’d be a sleeping beauty myself by page 23

  3. E0157H7 says:

    Why is piracy so common? Oh woe, oh pain and strife! If only we knew what made people want to choose piracy over a legitimate purchase…
    As if those long, drawn-out intros you can’t skip through aren’t enough.

  4. mattmoore says:

    The funny thing about the EULA is that it’s the same one used on all of the Disney websites. You can see that it’s from the Walt Disney Internet Group. It seems somewhat lazy and inappropriate that an online EULA would also apply to Blu-Rays.

  5. Ugly Canuck says:

    EULA’s need regulation like any other consumer contract.
    The Judges must have power to strip out the excess, so to speak, and leave the essential tasty marrow of the EULA for the Corps. to feed on.
    After all, these are not negotiated contracts, nor are they available for inspection by the consumer prior to purchase at the store.
    Maybe like mortgages a set of basic standard terms can be included in all EULAs by operation of Law, by Statute that is, with no need for the consumer to get hammered by legalese every time she wants to watch a cartoon, fer cryin’ out loud….

  6. pimplepoppermd says:

    dont go online with your blu ray player.

    you should use a ps3 anyway. disable the bd-live internet access and have the best and most versatile machine available.

  7. Ugly Canuck says:

    BTW I’m looking forward to my (pre-ordered) copy coming any day, I hear they opened the frame up to the full 2.55:1 aspect ratio.
    Plus for me it is the colors that make HD worthwhile, so I especially like HD animation (though this ain’t my favorite old Disney cartoon).
    Too bad about the legalese, though.

  8. Anonymous says:

    So THAT is the reason for Blu-Ray discs… can’t fit all that legal mumbo jumbo on a regular DVD.

  9. Anonymous says:

    Hi,
    Did anyone else notice the weird optical illusion on this post…? (or maybe it’s just me!)

    When I look at the main post (Image and text below it) I swear the page looks as if it’s sloping downward towards the right… spooky!

    regarding the issue (no of screens/words to read) I think it would be interesting to get a response from Disney to the question(s):
    “What percentage of the DVD’s audience do Disney expect…:
    i) To read the EULA
    ii) To understand it properly
    iii) Find it a worthwhile and helpful experience”

    I’d be interested in their expectations of their own customers.

    Maybe someone at BB has enough clout to get their attention and ask the question???

    Steve (UK).

  10. pctune says:

    Normally I’m a cheerleader for BB’s fights for digital freedom, but this seems like whining for the sake of it.

    Isn’t the EULA just for accessing the online content? Surely you can watch the actual movie without needing to agree to a Terms of Use…

    At least the description here at BB Gadgets is accurate. On the main page it’s much more dramatic (and misleading) – “Kids need to agree to 120+ pages of EULAs in order to watch BluRay Sleeping Beauty”

  11. Geminorus says:

    EULA’s need to die. Hitting the I Agree button is not the same as signing a contract so therefore EULA’s are pointless. Contracts require signature, clicking is not a signature.

    In the last 18 years of my life, I’ve clicked I Agree on probably 100,000+ EULA’s. In reality if I were to fully read and comprehend the EULA’s, I would waste about 3 years of my life in those 18 years. Which is almost on the same rate as to how much commercials you watch when watching your favorite show.

  12. Geminorus says:

    EULA’s need to die. Hitting the I Agree button is not the same as signing a contract so therefore EULA’s are pointless. Contracts require signature, clicking is not a signature.

    In the last 18 years of my life, I’ve clicked I Agree on probably 100,000+ EULA’s. In reality if I were to fully read and comprehend the EULA’s, I would waste about 3 years of my life in those 18 years. Which is almost on the same rate as to how much commercials you watch when watching your favorite show.

  13. Duffong says:

    Give it a rest, at least toddlers around the country will have PHD level reading skill before they even get to the movie.

    Nice one BB, always ignoring the positives…

  14. Anonymous says:

    So, if you dont agree you get your money back? It should be clearly illegal selling you the goods and then, once you have opened the wrapping, shazam!! A contract of using you might not agree with.

  15. Raygungirl says:

    We bought this Tuesday and were whining about this very thing. The BDLive bullcrap is something where you can chat with people while you watch the movie. *EYE. ROLL.* I don’t even know how this would work, as it WOULDN’T WORK for us. It took almost half an hour to download an update for a MOVIE on its release day (wireless PS3 connection because no ethernet cable we own will reach to the living room), and once we did and clicked it to check out what this monstrosity was all about, it didn’t actually work. We had to restart the PS3 to be able to watch the movie.

    [Insert pissy "HD-DVD never had this problem" comment here.] I still cannot believe Blu-Ray won. We supported HD first with our Xbox 360.

    You can probably skip past this when you start up the disc, but you shouldn’t *have* to.

  16. HarshLanguage says:

    #9 – Reading the original source article, it’s not entirely clear whether the EULAs were required before viewing the movie. The article does say that they got the BD-Live update screen after inserting the disc, and that update may have led directly to the EULAs. Or may not have; they may only have been displayed when the BD-Live stuff was viewed.

  17. Anonymous says:

    I went to the special screening at the Academy for the newly restored Sleeping Beauty and told myself that this may be my first blu-ray purchase.

    Now that I see Disney pulling this kind of junk, I wonder if I will bother. The film is excellently restored, but I won’t be signing my life away to watch it.

  18. Rob says:

    My ideal EULA would be something like “treat us fairly, and please don’t copy this too much.”

    That’s not too far off from what the old Borland C++ EULA was. IIRC, they called it the “Book License”. A small card. Large print. One sided.

  19. Ernunnos says:

    I hear they once used to have a thing called “common law”. Buyers and sellers could simply exchange money for goods and services without signing contracts, and yet they still had a whole bunch of legal rights and protections. Very strange. How did lawyers survive? And what did people do with all their time without contracts to read?

    Watched movies, I suppose.

  20. dculberson says:

    I can’t figure out what they hope to achieve with this. It definitely cost them a bundle of lawyer time, and it’s almost certainly unenforceable. Why bother? My ideal EULA would be something like “treat us fairly, and please don’t copy this too much.”

  21. dragonfrog says:

    @SAMF – that’s not a bad idea, but it doesn’t go far enough.

    Every store that deals in products with EULAs must keep a notary public on full-time staff, so they can ensure that all parties to the contract have a full understanding of its content. That’s the point of a contract, right – a “meeting of minds”.

  22. MarkHB says:

    You blew Imagineering out. If I had heroes, you’d be one of ‘em Cory.

    Disney’s badly broken, and still pretty powerful. It’s a symptom rather than being the disease: the disease is creatives being in a cancerous brainspace where they’re spending more on lawyers and board-member suits than they are on pencils, render farms and pogo sticks.

    Stick it to the man – buy a pogo stick and fire your lawyer.

  23. SamF says:

    To be fair, those are fairly short pages. If those were real full-size pages there’d probably be only like 10 or 12 of them. A perfectly acceptable number of pages of licensing agreement just to access content that you have already paid for.

    I think the next step in EULAs should be to have the salesperson at the store read the EULA to you out loud, and you have to verbally agree to it, before you purchase the product (or for online purchases, electronic agreement, but not until the entire EULA has been spoken out loud by a computerized voice).

    Think about it. They’re always passing laws to protect us from our own stupidity. So why not get them to pass a law to protect us from buying software that has outrageous licensing terms. Then, when people stop buying their games, movies, etc. those companies will stop trying to get us to agree to a wall of text that they know nobody reads.

  24. dculberson says:

    I found a pogo stick at the thrift store for $2.99. Best three bucks spent.

  25. quail says:

    Why the EULA on the Blu-Ray and not the normal DVD? Don’t both need protection of trade marks, characters, copyright, etc.? Or is there a ton of online crap that gets downloaded to your player when you view this thing?

    I’ll just stick to the old fashioned DVD, thanks.

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