Hong Kong camera phones have Escher-esque zoom out

hongkong.jpg

Photoshop Disasters spotted this Escher-esque ad for some nameless Hong Kong cell phone. I am impressed: not only can it take color pictures in a monochromatic world, but it has a hell of a zoom out lens.

Hong Kong: Amazing New Camera Phone [Photoshop Disasters]

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11 Responses to Hong Kong camera phones have Escher-esque zoom out

  1. Brad S. says:

    This specific HK phone comes with a robot “companion”, a small self-contained baseball-sized sphere called a HeLPeR (Helium-filled Levitating Personal Remote). Powered by your love and gratitude, it follows you around, opens doors for you, and as you wonder aloud the mysteries of your universe, it automatically executes Google searches and provides you with answers.

    Aside the usual MP3 and onacup features one would expect from an asian-market drone, HeLPeR also provides remote control and camera functions. What you actually see in the photo is from the drone’s perspective: the user is controlling the drone and snapping the photo. See how happy they are?

  2. josiah4jc says:

    1. Cameras can take pictures of themselves. This is done using a piece of advanced technology called a “mirror”.

    2. The whole monochrome/color joke is… let me put it this way: If you saw an advertisement showing a hummingbird swimming underwater, is your first instinct to say “fake”? If so, you are a moron. Artistic liberties can be taken. Get over it.

  3. Garr says:

    #3

    Errm. Maybe I’m falling for an underdeveleoped sense of humor here, but I’ll explain anyway:

    If you look closely, you’ll see that the preview on the camera’s/phone’s display actually shows the camera itself. This is physically impossible (the camera can’t take a picture of itself), which proves a case of bad photoshopping/lacking intelligence on behalf of whoever created the picture.
    I’m sure you already found yourself in the situation where you placed two mirrors opposite of each other, producing an endlessly shrinking pattern of repeating reflections. The same holds true here, just that it wasn’t intentional.

    What most probably happened was the editor/artist took a photo of the couple holding the camera, then pasted that exact image into the area containing the phone’s display in the image.

  4. Takuan says:

    I like #2

  5. chef says:

    Holy shit – these optics make me want to dump my Motorola KRAVE. Did I mention I’m working with Motorola now? Oh yeah, it has a touch screen or some other too late “me too” technology, but this HK phone blows it out of the water where it currently resides.

  6. Anonymous says:

    What on earth are you talking about?
    The reproduced (on screen) image is smaller than the original.

    What’s next, ‘print of moon smaller than reality’?

  7. Anonymous says:

    It just comes with the brand new Droste Effect lenses.

  8. Anonymous says:

    Wow, Josiah4JC, you really are totally determined to be a twit aren’t you.

    Yes, a camera can take a picture of itself, using a mirror. To do so, however, requires that the camera lens be pointed toward the mirror, not away from the mirror.

    Try this with an actual camera. You’ll notice that the object photographed is IN FRONT of the lens, not behind it.

    To take a picture as shown, the camera lens AND display screen would BOTH have to be on the same side, meaning that you either could never see what you were photographic until after the photo was taken, or you could only take pictures of your own face.

    Either the design agency is doing a laughably sloppy job, which, to most non-twits, was the point, or the camera company is advertising a new camera phone with no usable viewfinder.

  9. mdh says:

    For it to make visual sense you’d need to buy the phone then point it AT the billboard and check out the viewfinder. I bet it’s all in color.

    I don’t think that’s a total disaster, it’s just recursive.

  10. Garr says:

    The lens doesn’t zoom; instead it’s an array of specially crafted lenses that are shaped to catch resonant lightwaves resulting from natural interference occurring between light rays from behind the camera and those in front of the camera, taking into consideration the matrix of destructive interference caused by the camera itself. The complex algorithm behind this process is then able to determine how the picture would look like from a vantagepoint behind its own position.
    v2 of this model will be able to then trace its own shape and calculate what the image as rendered in v1 would look like if the camera itself had not been there through a very complicated algorithm involving frequency matrices, barometric measurements and psychological analysis of human perception.

  11. mdh says:

    Chef, your boss is awesome. ;)

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