Microsoft releases gigapixel image viewer Seadragon…for iPhone

seadragon.jpg

Brother Zuzu writes: “Seadragon, the predecessor to Photosynth, by Blaise Aguera y Arcas, has been ported to the iPhone! (The battle of the Zooming User Interfaces is on, between Microsoft Live Labs and Apple’s own Core Animation.)”

Seadragon is a free download which makes it possible to view gigapixel images on a small screen.

I will simply echo my comments from when Google Earth was release on the iPhone first: “Hurrrr durrrrrr huh?” (I’m not positive this is exactly what I said.)

When two of the three major competitors to your smartphone platform are releasing their experimental or cutting-edge software on your platform, something is going wrong — for them.

Seadragon Mobile download [iTunes]

PreviouslyTop 10 TED Talks: Blaise Aguera y Arcas demos Photosynth

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3 Responses to Microsoft releases gigapixel image viewer Seadragon…for iPhone

  1. kamiikoneko says:

    “”When two of the three major competitors to your smartphone platform are releasing their experimental or cutting-edge software on your platform, something is going wrong — for them.””

    I think that’s not necesarily true. The iPhone simply has market saturation. If you are going to test a new app to see how well it is received on a mobile platform, why NOT do it on the top selling smartphone and make a dime while you’re at it. The bigger your beta, the more bugs get returned in a finite span of time. I know this isn’t a beta, but by releasing their application to a large crowd, they can really gauge its performance in the wild. Releasing it on their own systems may not be as profitable as a first move…

    Still, it does feel kind of weird to see it, I’ll say that.

  2. scaught says:

    This is a great app!

    I’m still a mac user, but have kind of retired any sense of zealotry I had about the platform long ago. That said, until recently I’ve always felt microsoft was kind of crappy of it’s own merits (and not just from a Cupertino comparison perspective). Now I think they’re doing cool and interesting things (like this app, the xbox, zune, etc). It will be interesting to see what happens with windows 7.

  3. zuzu says:

    I will simply echo my comments from when Google Earth was release on the iPhone first

    When two of the three major competitors to your smartphone platform are releasing their experimental or cutting-edge software on your platform, something is going wrong — for them.

    I think that’s not necesarily true. The iPhone simply has market saturation.

    I’ll wager we can be a little more specific: The iPhone is what the developers are actually using themselves as customers, rather than what their employer companies are developing as products to sell.

    For people with the knowledge and access to tools to development, they’ll gladly hack on what they already know and love to make it even better. For Blaise Aguera y Arcas (who developed Seadragon and then was bought out by Microsoft), he probably has few real attachments to Microsoft, except perhaps that they want to make sure Photosynth is written in .NET or some such.

    Same for Google Earth on the iPhone; the lead time and popularity of Apple hardware in Google City (or whatever it’s called now) likely translates to far more people having an iPhone than a G1. There’d need to be a very strong hacker culture for the G1 (maybe even free G1 units for anyone working at Google) for that to flip — leveraged by the frictions of development on the iPhone due to Apple’s Gosplan-like central planning.

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