iMyst

Picture 1.jpg

Classic interactive flipbook Myst is now avaialble for just $6 on the AppStore — as a colossal 730 megabyte download that requires 1.5GB of empty space to install! Scenes are newly rendered for the iPhone and iPod, you can swipe to move, and all the movies and other features of the original are present. [AppStore via 9to5Mac]

About Rob Beschizza

Rob Beschizza is the Managing Editor of Boing Boing. He's @beschizza on Twitter and can be found on Facebook too. Email is dead, but you can try your luck at besc...@gmail.com
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8 Responses to iMyst

  1. haineux says:

    The reason the original MYST was “only” 600 MB was that every single picture was tuned to an optimized 8-bit GIF file — just 256 colors in each picture, you get to pick which 256.

    So having the game be about 750 MB is pretty easily explained by using 24-bit color when they had to re-render to fit the screen size.

    I heard an interview with some of the programmers who said that they used this limitation as a deliberate design rule, and developed certain color palates for each world, forgoing the use of certain colors entirely, as a way of developing a subliminal “feel” for an environment.

    The reason they ported MYST instead of RealMYST? Are there any 3D engines available for iPhone yet? I don’t think so. In any case, porting a “slideshow engine” is easier

    Speaking of which, I am still sad that RealMYST stopped working on current Mac OS’s after about two years. Indeed, the best way to play many old games is to find a PC emulator and install the PC version of the game. Often the emulators are considerably less fragile than the games, alas.

    But the worst thing is that URU was only briefly officially available for Mac. I am hating having to configure a windows machine to use it. Maybe I can borrow one with it already installed.

  2. Seg says:

    More information can be found on Cyan’s website for the iPhone/iTouch version of Myst.

    I hope that Cyan Worlds does a postmortem on bringing the game to the iPhone. A few immediate questions I have are what kinds of decisions were made to update the port. Was there a point where they pulled punches to make the game have the spirit of the 1993 release?

  3. Seg says:

    @Rob I’m sure the reason not to do RealMYST was it was easier to recreate the slideshow interface than it is to figure out porting the Havoc engine (if I remember correctly). That thing was a beast of an engine.

  4. Rob Beschizza says:

    There are a number of 3D games on iphone. RealMYST would be doable!

  5. Seg says:

    I want to correct myself that it wasn’t Havoc. Had my APIs mixed up. Sorry!

  6. Anonymous says:

    realMYST didn’t use Havok, as all of the “physics” in that game was just prebaked animations. But even so, the level of detail in that game wouldn’t really work out on the iPhone. And even if they lowered the detail enough to make it work, it’d drain the battery at a ridiculous rate. Considering that Myst involves more time than most 4-5 minute iPhone games, battery life is pretty important.

    Regarding the size… keep in mind that all of the graphics and video were based off of the Myst Masterpiece Edition version of the game, and that disc sits right at 700MB… and the iPhone version of the game seems to be a little higher quaity, as well as all of the tiny videos from before now having to be full screen in order to be supported by the iPhone.

  7. Rob Beschizza says:

    I’m sure — there’s no reason they couldn’t have ported RealMYST and had a better game. It’s pure nostalgia

  8. dculberson says:

    Wow. The original was only about 400mb; gotta wonder why it’s almost doubled in size!

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