Review: 15 minutes with Pledge’s Fabric Sweeper for Pet Hair

Pledge’s $5 hair box is a plastic gadget equipped with rollers. Designed to squeeze up pet hair regardless of which direction it’s rolled, it’s more expensive than adhesive rollers–but claims to be better. I picked one up at Target and put it to the dog bed. Thoughts:

• It works as well as a roller, but not better.
• Definitely not as gross as roller sheets.
• It’s ridiculously designed to make it impossible to empty.
• But it works just fine if you empty and re-use it.

Pledge’s decision to to mold the cover permanently to the base is a cheap attempt at screwing customers, but it’s a neat gadget all the same–and nothing an Xacto knife can’t fix.

Update: Reader I Am At Work offers a useful Instructable on re-using them.

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Rob Beschizza is the Managing Editor of Boing Boing. He's @beschizza on Twitter and can be found on Facebook too. Try your luck at besc...@gmail.com

 

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14 Responses to Review: 15 minutes with Pledge’s Fabric Sweeper for Pet Hair

  1. Maxwell says:

    I’ve actually had good luck with one of these infomercial lint rollers

    http://www.asseenontv.com/prod-pages/lint_wizard.html

    Works as well or better than adhesive rollers, and you can empty it.

    Doesn’t seem very solidly built, but it’s held up for several months. Should last indefinitely if not abused.

  2. HeatherB says:

    Mypalmike, I have one of those as well and they don’t work well on bed coverlets, comforters or loose fabrics. That’s why we have the other solutions.

  3. HeatherB says:

    Oh, and the vac doesn’t work on clothes either, so having the sticky stuff or the pledge is handy to have around.

  4. Rob Beschizza says:

    We have one of those undercoat brushes, a different brand, and can verify the INSANE mountains of fur that come out. Seems to make our thickly-undercoated one feel happy too.

  5. haineux says:

    There is an excellent product with a silly name, called The Furminator. http://www.furminator.com/

    The pictures you see on their website seem unbelievable, utterly impossible, but I swear they are true: 5 minutes with this thing can remove several cats worth of excess hair. Literally the only thing I’ve ever seen that can remove so much hair that the cat literally can’t shed any more.

    It is expensive, but it is a custom-cut metal comb. The ends of the comb teeth are rounded, but further down, the teeth get close enough together to pinch the loose fur and pull it out. (That sounds like it might be painful, but it isn’t.)

    The best part is, every cat we’ve tried it on, they LOVE it. LOVE LOVE LOVE. Show it to them, and they drop onto the ground, belly up, BEGGING to be “FURMINATED.”

    It also is extremely effective at removing cat hair from many surfaces. I just drag it over the couch or the rug.

    The other cat-hair-remover PAR EXCELLENCE, especially for your clothing, is a sponge made out of latex rubber (not cellulose), sometimes called a “dust control sponge.” You can tell you’ve got the right one because it’s heavy, and has a lot of surface friction.

    Hair sticks to it, so you just wipe off your clothes. One or two passes is all it takes. Infinitely re-usable, just peel the hair off or shake it clean. Don’t wet it. Lasts for over a decade. It is about $5 at the home/kitchen department stores.

  6. Zan says:

    This product is really the epitome of what is wrong with out society. You design a device that replaces wasteful sticky roller sheets, and engineer in hard plastics, bearings, and gears, and then you intentionally hamper it so that it too becomes wasteful trash. When did we give companies the idea that we are willing to throw away perfectly usable devices simply because they want us to? Unlike disposable razors or batteries, there is nothing wrong with this device once it is filler with hair.

    I don’t know whether to boycott this product or buy it and reuse it to spite the company.

  7. mugczar says:

    My wife and I bought one of these a while back (we had a coupon, was on sale) and I found it really easy to pop out one of the rollers with a flat-blade screwdriver, scoop out the hair and pop the roller back in.

    Have discovered that the covering on the roller wears out over time, but we still can get 2x or 3x the use Pledge originally engineered into the design.

  8. HeatherB says:

    I found that using tweezers through the middle and pulling out the hair is an easy way to empty and reuse with no damage.

  9. Suburbancowboy says:

    I bought a self cleaning lint brush at Bed Bath and Beyond. It was ten bucks. I pick up an unbelievable amount of cat hair with it. Every day I use it to clean my couch.

    When the brush gets filled with hair, you just flip a switch on the back and it deposits the hair in an easy to empty container on the back of the brush.

    The thing works great.

    Please boycott this pledge product.

  10. mypalmike says:

    Save yourself from the misery. For around $40, a good hand vac with motorized brush is the right tool for the job. My couch goes from nasty to hairless (seriously, not a trace of it) in around 30 seconds. It’s an order of magnitude faster than roller tape.

  11. mypalmike says:

    By the way, I think this is the one I have:

  12. i_am_at_work says:

    Here is a handy instructable to make these easy to empty.

    http://www.instructables.com/id/Modify_a_Pledge_Fabric_Sweeper_so_you_can_empty_it/

    These are magic with cat hair.

  13. getjustin says:

    Or clean it out without using Velcro.

    http://bit.ly/13h34K

  14. scaught says:

    I did pretty well in my battle against 2 cats worth of hair on the couch with a microfiber-ish cloth dampened with water and a vacuum.

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