Why giving court powers to the music industry won’t work

Nicholas Deleon serves up some sanity in the whole “extrajudicial ISP executions” concept so beloved of the music industry: what exactly will it do if it gets its way? It will have to either enforce very selectively indeed, or go after millions of people. This is no different to the status quo; it just streamlines the existing process of making examples of a few offenders and being despised by everyone else. [CrunchGear]

These guys are the dumbest venture capitalists on Earth. They’ve made terrible business decisions, and as a result have lost their market to technological innovation, lost their back catalog to pirates, and lost their investment model to consumers who no longer need an unnatural selector to choose acts for them.

The music industry is a joke that gets funnier every time it spends millions marketing and autotuning some talentless model, then wonders why it needs to beg for legislation to protect it from change.

About Rob Beschizza

Rob Beschizza is the Managing Editor of Boing Boing. He's @beschizza on Twitter and can be found on Facebook too. Try your luck at besc...@gmail.com

 

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3 Responses to Why giving court powers to the music industry won’t work

  1. “The music industry is a joke that gets funnier every time it spends millions marketing and autotuning some talentless model, then wonders why it needs to beg for legislation to protect it from change.”

    That’s a little unfair. There are also thousands of independent musicians who have suffered from the sea-change, through not fault of their own

  2. eain says:

    “beg for legislation to protect it from change”

    The sad part is, it’ll probably be given massive amounts of money to stay afloat, not unlike the banking and auto industries.

  3. chuck says:

    There is a very easy fix to this. Have everyone stop listening to this crap music.

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