Binibottle: Teen Invents Easy-Fill Water Bottle

binibottle.jpg

Here's a simple idea that I wouldn't be surprised to see in new water bottle designs soon: A bottle with a second filler cap on the side to make it easier to fill in shallow sinks. (Or in my case, a sink still brimming with dirty dishes.) The "Binibottle" was created as part of a inventor's contest.

From Oh Gizmo:

And believe it or not this simple but extremely helpful innovation was created by 15 year old Anna Axelsson. She designed the bottle for the Finnupp inventor's contest and ended up winning the gold medal. The bottle can apparently be found in Swedish sporting good stores for around $5 and it's safe to assume Anna won't have any trouble paying for college when the time comes.

Product Page (Finnish?) [Sportflaskor.nu via Oh Gizmo]

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30 Comments

  1. Oh man, what a great idea. I hate trying to fill large bottles in the sink because half the water stream goes down the drain. To me, this thing is a “duh” moment. Why hadn’t somebody thought of this before?

  2. Nice, but the part about college is a bit silly. She is is swedish, she doesn’t have to pay for her education. ying for college when the time comes.

  3. Sorry, but is everybody serious?

    I think that this is one of the dumbest things I have seen in a while. She put another hole in the bottle???

    NO NOBEL FOR YOU!

  4. somehow i don’t see how someone can be called innovator when she stole this from the water container from a super soaker water gun and added a sports cap on one of its ends. its like me adding a delete key on my mouse so i don’t have to put down my beer while i work.

  5. Well SURE it looks obvious now that she’s done it. Also, my mouse button already has a delete key.

  6. As a solution to the stated problem (shallow sinks), the bottle is overkill.

    A much better solution is to have a spout at a 45-degree angle to the axis of the bottle, either on the axis or offset. Easy fill, easy empty. Would probably be easier to use, too.

  7. Fuck everybody who thinks this is not an invention. It can’t be that simple or trivial if nobody thought of it before.
    Shouting “Everybody could have come up with that” just makes you a shitcock. Fucking shitcocks.

  8. EMBALLATOR?? wtf? What genius thought up the name for that ‘gadget’? I think she’s smiling at what she’ll be doing with it…..

  9. i’m sorry, looks like a lot of people here mistook me for claiming this girl as a retard who learned how to drink for the very first time. i have not said anything along the line of, “hell, i could have thought of that” or “hey, that’s my idea!”

    i’m taking this more upon the light in that she thought of a new/lazy approach and got awarded for it. thus i wondered how people like this get an award for being an “innovator”. she can get claims to a patent, or commercialize on this idea even though it was taken from something already found in the market.

    in my eyes, innovator would have to be someone that revolutionized the way we do something. being the wheel, a light bulb, the flux capasitor… you get where i’m coming from.

    does she desirve this? sure, she won it fair and square. does she desirve the title to which many genious or creative minds share? no.

  10. I worked for an educational summer camp in America that was sponsored by the Patent office and was a camp for young inventors. At the end of the week, each kid had something small that theu either modded or invented that they showed off. I don’t know how it is over there, but the contract that their parents signed stated that if the kid’s invention was any good, the US Patent office owned it outright, since it was developed at the camp. Lucky the girl wasn’t in America, or she probably would have learned a hard lesson while all of Sweden refilled their water bottles.

  11. >EMBALLATOR?? wtf? What genius thought up the name for that ‘gadget’?

    “Emballator” and “Mellerud plast” are company names, possibly the manufacturer of the bottles.

  12. Hello,

    Actually, I am the inventor, invented several years ago a container(tube) that has caps on the container’s sides:

    http://appft1.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PG01&p=1&u=/netahtml/PTO/srchnum.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=20010035428.PGNR.&OS=DN/20010035428&RS=DN/20010035428

    It does not matter – is it a bottle, tube or any other container.

    They all are containers.

    So, how it was possible that a patent or trademark and Gold Medal:

    http://www.ohgizmo.com/2007/10/10/binibottle-can-be-easily-filled-anywhere/

    was granted in Sweden to Anna Axelsson?

    Regards,

    Yuly Shipilevsky

    yulysh2000@yahoo.ca

  13. To the person claiming to have invented this previously (Yuly Shipilevsky).

    Your patent seemed to describe a tube container with holes on the top and the bottom. With this girl’s design, the convenience is within the ability to fill it up in small spaces, via the hole on the SIDE of the container, whereas your design would be completely incapable of doing so, and would require the exact same amount of space to fill it up using either of the holes.

  14. To: MOUSTACHE

    Did you see the description and especially drawings
    in my U.S. patent application(follow the web link, provided by me)?

    It is crystal clearly described and depicted
    that it’s supposed to be implemented holes not
    just on the TOP and the BOTTOM,
    but on SIDES of the container AS WELL
    (do you see
    two holes, located on SIDES of the container in the figures, described in my U.S. patent application? – click IMAGE button on the top of web page to see figures as well,
    if not – download tiff format software from uspto.gov). In addition to the figures, it is clearly written in the description(follow the web link).

    When I wrote the application I understood that
    I should cover all possibilities – that’s why
    I described holes located on SIDES as well.

  15. TO MOUSTACHE:

    In addition to my U.S. Patent application an article is published at “PACKAGING INNOVATION”
    magazine, March 2001, Volume 5, Issue 6, page 2,
    bottom: “Extra apertures solve toothpaste dilemmas”.

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