Andy Baio on the evolution of Olympics pirating

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Andy Baio over at Waxy has posted a great little write-up on the evolution of Olympics Games pirating between 2004 and 2008.

Back in 2004, the place to go for illegal Olympic videos wasn't BitTorrent, popular trackers like Suprnova, or mainstream P2P clients. The best coverage, surprisingly, was found in the old-school Usenet binaries. It was a mish-mash of events, skewed heavily towards events with bikini-clad women, Brazilians, or bikini-clad Brazilian women, but other popular events and the opening ceremonies also showed up.

Today, the event coverage in Usenet is just as sporadic, but the quality is dramatically better... But the trend for this year is clear – Usenet passed the torch to BitTorrent.

Especially interesting: according to a chart by Mark Guggenheim, 65% of all Olympics footage BitTorrenting is being done within China. Probably because no one was actually allowed in to see the games.

Pirating the Olympics: Then and Now [Waxy]

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4 Comments

  1. “65% of all Olympics footage BitTorrenting is being done within China. Probably because no one was actually allowed in to see the games.”

    I hope you’re simply being facetious 😉 I wouldn’t be surprised if 65% is the actual percentage of the olympic-viewing world population who are in China.

  2. I got the BBC and China TV versions of the Opening ceremonies/parade of athletes, simply due to the fact that NBC (The US provider) has the most insipid morons who constantly natter on throughout the whole thing, and that NBC chopped it up in order to show commercials.

    Thanks to BitTorrent, I was able to enjoy the whole spectacle as it was intended.

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