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11 Comments

  1. God, I love Pantone colors. Worst case scenario: if you can’t solve it, you get great color scheme ideas.

  2. @ #3:

    Rubik’s Cubes can only be solved in one unique way anyway: there’s only one ‘centre’ tile for each colour, and the edge/corner tiles are set in position by the colours of the tiles they are permanently adjoined to.

  3. There is one added layer of complexity here. Although the squares all do have one and only one position they can be in when solved, the rotation of the center squares can wind up very scrambled.

  4. Pantone is the standard printers’ inks (printer’s press, not color printers like HP).
    When you see the CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow and black) registers at the edge of a printed page, those are probably Pantone.

  5. Cyan… now that is a beautiful color. I’ve always thought of that as turquoise/aquamarine. I’ve painted a few walls that color. Bedroom/hall is painted an orange/coral color. Those two colors go well together.

  6. Suddenly I have a vision of an Optimus Maximus Rubik’s Cube where every face is an OLED display.

    I guess such a cube would be really easy to cheat at (that is, uh, reset), though.

  7. @ #7

    Pantone makes CMYK inks, but all the printers I know refuse to use them for day to day CMYK jobs because they are more expensive than other vendors.

    Pantone is more well known for what are called “spot” colors, which look like your typical Home Depot paint chips but have specific numbers (like the 291 C you see up there above the cyan chips). Many companies have a specific Pantone color for their logo that CMYK inks can’t necessarily reproduce because Pantone inks use a different mixing process. That means they can make all kinds of weird colors, like metallics and fluorescents. They even have interior paints now:

    http://www.pantone.com/pages/Pantone/pantone.aspx?ca=34&pg=20100

    You can buy Pantone books that have the whole color library in them, and Adobe packages Pantone software color libraries with all their publishing products. Be prepared for some serious money output, though… swatch books can be over $100 each.

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